Aldborough House

We are delighted to announce that we received a decision to grant planning for the Aldborough House scheme.The aim of the proposed redevelopment is to create an exemplar office headquarters complex, combining both old and new buildings, the centre piece of which will be the fully-restored late eighteenth-century mansion known as Aldborough House, a protected structure. The house was the last great city mansion to be built in Dublin, being completed just before the Act of Union changed considerably the social status of the city. Currently the house is in an advanced state of dereliction surrounded by high walls, with the majority of its original curtilage redeveloped as a four-story social housing block. The proposals include the removal of the boundary walls, guard house and former, much-altered theatre. They also include full restoration of the main house and the south pavilion wing and reconstruction of the long demolished northern chapel pavilion, together with linking colonnaded screen wall. This will open up the fully restored entrance front and principal elevation of the building to the street as originally intended.

Aldborough House is a significant scale of building in its own right. The proposed redevelopment seeks to frame its landmark presence within a unified edifice and enhanced contemporary setting providing 10,000sqm of Grade A office accommodation. Our design approach aims to create an urban marker that reflects and ties the disparate scales together at the Five Lamps junction while incorporating and restoring the existing structure as the centrepiece and entrance front. The new contemporary 5 storey wings are designed to create new facades and forms derived from the solidity, mass and materiality of the surrounding urban context, forming a strong relationship with the formal order of the existing structure. The two side facades on the street are a woven pattern of brickwork relating to the materiality of the neighbouring houses and the rear and side elevations of the house. The principal facades facing Portland Row are richly modulated to echo the materials and proportions of the protected structure. In contrast, the interior glazed facades are conceived as a light counter balance to provide “shadow gaps” between the heavier masonry of the street facades and the historic masonry of Aldborough House.

Proposed Aerial view

Proposed Aerial view

Engraving of the Proposed House 1796

Engraving of the Proposed House 1796

Proposed View from the 5 Lamps

Proposed View from the 5 Lamps